Common Diseases Passed by Pigeons

The rats of the sky, as pigeons are commonly called, are given the name in large part by the number of diseases they can carry and pass on to humans. If your home or commercial workplace hosts pigeons it is important to speak with a pest control specialist about ridding the birds from their new home. Having these pests birds in your area puts you at risk of contracting diseases, some of which can prove fatal. The following are some of the most common diseases passed by pigeons.

Salmonella & Listeria

While commonly thought of as food-borne illnesses, these diseases are also carried by these unhealthy birds. Listeria is quite dangerous, especially for pregnant women and babies, as they can cause premature delivery, stillbirths and death.

E. Coli

Pigeon droppings are often ripe with with E. Coli. This is a deadly disease at can cause anemia and kidney failure. More commonly a person may suffer from urinary tract infections or other types of infections that will cause a high risk of fever.

Viral Encephalitis

Pigeons are known carriers of West Nile virus, Western Equine Encephalomyelitis and St. Louis Encephalitis. A person can contract these diseases from a pigeon when a mosquito bites an infected bird and then bites a human. These diseases are quite dangerous and can cause everything from temporary illness to permanent nervous system damage or death.

Cryptococcal Meningitis

Another devastating disease carried by these birds can cause numerous issues, including inducing comas, sudden onset of blindness or for those in weaker health, death.

If you find your property being flooded with the birds don’t let them settle in. Contact a pest bird control specialist right away. For expert pest bird control in Phoenix, Peoria, Glendale, Scottsdale or the surrounding area reach out to the team at Arizona Organic Pest & Termite Control. We handle all sorts of residential and commercial pest control issues. Give us a call to schedule pest control in Phoenix, Arizona.

2018-04-11T00:40:33+00:00 May 21st, 2017|